Back to Syringes and Injection Products Autopen 1.5

The Autopen by Owen Mumford is unique among insulin pens because its trigger is on the side instead of the end. In addition, a spring within the Autopen injects the insulin. This differs from other pens which rely on you to press the trigger and inject the insulin. Because of the side mounted trigger and spring delivery, the Autopen is easier to use than other pens.

The Autopen comes in three models:

ModelCartridge SizeDosage
AN31001.5 ml1-16 units, 1 unit increments
AN30001.5 ml2-32 units, 2 unit increments
AN38003.0 ml2-42 units, 2 unit increments

The Autopen Case

Kids and adults who inject lower dosages will find the AN3100, with 1 unit increments, a better choice than the other models which deliver insulin in 2 unit increments.

The Autopen measures 6.5 inches long (14.3 cm) and 5/8 inch (1.4 cm) in diameter. Loaded with a Humalog cartridge and a UniFine needle, the Autopen weighs 1 ounce (27 grams). It comes with a hard plastic case that holds the pen, three needles and one extra insulin cartridge.

Like all pens, the Autopen is simple to use. The unit unscrews easily to replace the insulin cartridge. Both Lilly and Novo 1.5 ml insulin cartridges fit in the Autopen. The Autopen comes with UniFine Pentip needles, available in 1/2" or 5/16" lengths. Both lengths are 29 gauge, making the UniFine Pentip needles a little larger than both the Novo and B-D needles. All pen needles are interchangeable among the three major pen makers, so you can use whatever needle you like best.

The insulin dosage is dialed in by turning the end of the unit. The dosage ranges from 1 to 16 units. Even units from 2 to 16 are marked, with odd units indicated by a line. Each time one unit is dialed in, you hear and feel a "click." If you accidentally dial in too many units, and you don't want to waste the insulin, you need to remove the insulin cartridge, pull the trigger, reset the plunger, and prime the pen. The Novo 1.5 and B-D pens have a simpler way to "back off" an over-dialed dose.

Loading an insulin cartridge is simple: unscrew the pen, reset the plunger, and drop in the cartridge. Kids will have no problem learning how to do this. Attaching a needle is equally easy: simply open the needle package and screw it on to the Autopen. Like all pens, after injection, the Autopen should be held against the skin for several seconds to ensure delivery of the complete dose. The instruction sheet recommends five seconds.

Pen injectors are an excellent way to deliver extra insulin, especially Humalog, when blood sugars are higher than desired. Kids can easily keep a pen at school for pre-lunch injections too. The side trigger makes the Autopen the easiest pen injector to use. Just be careful to dial in the correct dose.

Owen Mumford Limited
Brook Hill, Woodstock
Oxford OX20 1TU, England
01993 812021 Voice
01993 813466 Fax

Owen Mumford Incorporated
1755-A West Oak Commons Court
Marietta, GA 30062
(800) 421-6936
(770) 977-2866 Fax
Owen Mumford Limited
BP 444
27204 Vernon Cedex France
32 51 88 70 Voice
32 21 96 95 Fax
Owen Mumford GmbH
Runde Turmstrasse 8 D-63785
Obernburg, Germany
06022/72268 Voice
06022/72577 Fax
The reviews of products are the opinion of children with DIABETES. Each product is reviewed with a single purpose: to determine if the product is suitable for use by children with type 1 diabetes, their parents, and, to a lesser degree, adults with type 1 diabetes. There are many products aimed at adults with type 2 diabetes that are not appropriate or suitable for children or adults with type 1 diabetes.

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Last Updated: Thursday February 27, 2014 19:28:20
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