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  Back to Products Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Introduction

Continuous glucose sensors are revolutionizing diabetes care by offering, for the first time, a minute-by-minute window into glucose levels and to alarm when glucose levels exceed safe thresholds. Parents of kids with diabetes and adults with diabetes will be able to sleep through the night, knowing that an unexpected low blood sugar will be detected and an alarm will sound. (See citations below about nocturnal hypoglycemia.) Everyone will be able to see the immediate effects of food on their glucose levels, and will be able to make changes in their diets to improve glucose control.

Continuous sensing is not equivalent to blood glucose however. Continuous sensors measure glucose in the interstitial space, not the blood. While the two values correlate well when the blood glucose is stable, there is a difference during periods of rapid change, such as immediately after a meal. This does not mean that continuous sensors are not accurate, or even that they are less accurate. They just measure something different. Everyone involved in diabetes -- the patients, the diabetes team members, the scientific community, and industry -- are learning how to make the best sense of this new data. And along the way, the nature of treating diabetes is changing.

Continuous Blood Glucose Monitoring Products

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November 8, 2013



                 
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Last Updated: Thursday February 27, 2014 19:28:20
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