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Immediate Feedback on HbA1c Improves Control

When you visit your diabetes team, do you get an HbA1c test right there and discuss the results right away? You would if your diabetes team used a DCA VantageTM Analyzer, and your blood sugar control would be better for it.

Traditionally, patients would visit their diabetes team, have blood drawn from their arm (which most people do not like), discuss their care, and then, several days later, receive a report in the mail or a call from their doctor with their HbA1c result. At that time, there's no way to review the report and devise strategies for improving control if it's warranted.

With the Bayer DCA 2000, a finger stick is all it takes to get an HbA1c test done. Results are available in minutes, so you can discuss them immediately with your diabetes team.

In the study referenced below, 201 patients were randomized into two groups. One group had HbA1c levels determined at the time of the diabetes team visits using the DCA 2000 (the immediate assay group), while the other group (the control group) used the traditional laboratory method. HbA1c levels decreased significantly in the immediate assay group, at both 6 months (-0.57 +/- 1.44%) and 12 months (-0.40 +/- 1.65%), P < 0.01. The improvements were similar for people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

If your diabetes team is still using a laboratory to measure your HbA1c, encourage them to consider a DCA 2000. Not only is it easier for you (finger stick versus venous blood draw), but your overall control is likely to improve.

From Immediate feedback of HbA1c levels improves glycemic control in type 1 and insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients. (Diabetes Care 22:1785-1789, 1999).

For More Information

Posted 6 November 1999
Updated 23 August 2002

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Last Updated: Thursday February 27, 2014 19:28:21
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