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Question:
My daughter is 15 months old and was diagnosed less than a month ago. Regarding her finger pricks, sometimes due to her nap or whatever, have to do her finger prick 2 hours after her last meal or snack. Is that too soon? Should we pick times of the day and stick to them no matter when she ate? I typically give her the morning insulin shot at 7:30, she eats breakfast at 7:45, snack at 10, lunch at 12:30, snack at 3, insulin at 5:30, dinner at 5:45, snack at 8:30. Right now she's on 4N in the morning and 1R at night. Her lunch readings have been high in the last couple of days but if we had waited a half hour they probably would be lower?

Also, what percentage of kids under 18 were diagnosed this young?

Answer:
As you are well aware, little kids don't follow a rigid schedule, and it will be necessary for you to "go with the flow" for the next few years.

It really doesn't matter when you check the sugar level, as long as you know how long after a meal it has been, and as long as your Diabetes Team and you take the timing into account when adjusting insulin doses.

Diabetes is uncommon under the age of two, and we'd strongly suggest that a child this young should be under the care of a experienced Diabetes Team that is used to dealing with the special problems of infants and toddlers with diabetes.

Original posting 14 Dec 95

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:52
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