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Question:

From Canada:

I firmly believe that to achieve a high degree of control in blood sugar level there has to be a continuous feedback device to alert the individual of current blood sugar levels.

Once this is established, an alert would dictate whether to add or decrease insulin requirements. In short, a continuous monitoring device that indirectly monitors sugar, via body temperature, blood pressure or heart palpitations. The incidence of hypoglycemia is probably associated with a drop in body temperature, or blood pressure, or some other variable that can be monitored indirectly through a wrist watch type of device.

Please advise if you have anything in this spectrum of diagnostic tools.

Answer:

Several year ago Teledyne Avionics came out with a wristwatch-like device called the "Sleep Sentry" that continuously monitored for low blood sugars by sensing changes in skin temperature and conductivity associated with low blood sugar. Unfortunately, normal sweating also set off the alarm and was particularly a problem during sleep.

At the present time, Cygnus, Inc. is developing another watch-like device which measures blood glucose every 30 minutes and stores the readings which can be downloaded and analyzed later on. An alarm for hypo- and hyperglycemia is planned by Cygnus for its GlucoWatch.

TGL

Original posting 8 May 96

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:52
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