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From Microsoft Network:

My son is 9 and has had diabetes since he was 5. His control has been pretty good so far but lately we have some high blood sugar readings after lunch and we are working to bring them down by adjusting his insulin. How bad is it for him to have high readings if we catch it quickly and get it back down?


There is no good answer to your question of how "bad" it is to have high blood sugars which you "catch quickly and get back down." I think there is now general agreement that everyone with diabetes should try to have as many normal blood sugars "as possible." (Not long ago, many diabetes specialists didn't think it was important to try to obtain as close to normal blood sugars as possible). I think what many people don't realize is that in 1996 we still don't have the means of "perfect control." Even in the Diabetes Control and Complication Study (DCCT), only 4% of the adult patients in the "intensive control" part of the study were able to keep their hemoglobin A1c in the high normal range. The remainder of the study participants were not able to keep their hemoglobin A1c in the normal range. The teenagers weren't able to get as good control as the adults. Children under 13 weren't studied. Some people find it easier to maintain near normal blood sugars than others who may try just as hard (or even harder than the ones who get better control).

You have to remember as your child grows, he will need more insulin. The only way you will know that it is time to increase his insulin is to have some high blood sugar readings. There is no way to anticipate when you need to increase the insulin to prevent a high blood sugar. It sounds like you are obtaining the best control possible in your son.


Original posting 3 Nov 96


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:52
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