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From Virginia, USA:

My son is 14. He was diagnosed at age 11. Lately, he eats constantly from the time he gets home at around 3 pm until he goes to bed. His sugars in the mornings are generally better than in the evenings. He tests twice a day, and takes 2 shots a day. I know this is the stage, he is probably going through a growth spurt. How can we reduce the high sugars, and at the same time take care of his increased calorie needs? He is constantly hungry. We are already using the "free" foods like salads, diet soda, popsicles, etc. but they are not satisfying for him.


You did not mention if your son was overweight, underweight, or normal weight for his height. During the growth spurt, all teens need more food to grow, and if you have diabetes, you need more insulin to match the increased food intake to try and keep the blood sugar as close to normal as possible.

I find that most teens need to meet with a dietitian at this stage to help them determine how much food they need to grow. It is important to try and keep the food/carbohydrate intake as consistent as possible from day to day (with daily changes as necessary to account for changes in exercise) so you can try and balance the food intake with insulin. If his weight is not excessive for his height, he probably needs more food and more insulin to control the blood sugar. If he is gaining weight excessively, his hunger may be a sign of too much insulin.


Original posting 9 Feb 97


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:54
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