advertisement
 

  Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team
Question:

From Illinois, USA:

I have a question related to stress. Our 3.5 year old daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 3 years ago. Although her overall control has been good (Hba1c = 6.2%), her blood sugar levels are quite volatile. In trying to understand some of the high readings (over 250) we think stress may play a factor. Is a good idea to attempt to document hypoglycemia at 3 P.M. with a stressful situation (very tired and irritable, fight with sister....) at say 2 P.M.? Not that we can stop stress from occurring, but just to know what may be causing these high readings will stop us from trying to prevent it through insulin or food.

Answer:

It is often difficult to figure out what causes unexpected high or low blood sugars in a young child. Stress can increase or decrease the blood sugar. If you feel that stress in the afternoon increases your child's blood sugar at 3 A.M., you should try to see if the average blood sugar at 3 A.M. is indeed consistently higher or lower on nights after arguments with her sibling compared to the average blood sugar on nights with no fights with her sibling the preceding afternoon. If you find there is a consistent pattern, you should discuss with your child's physician either changing the food or insulin on such nights to try and prevent the change in blood sugar.

You are correct that you can not avoid stress in life, but you can try to anticipate its effect on the blood sugar and act accordingly.

TGL

Original posting 10 Mar 97

  
advertisement


                 
  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:54
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.