Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team

From Sacramento County, California, USA:

My son had high readings (250) two days in a row when being checked by his doctor for growth problems. He was put in the hospital for three days, but they didn't start insulin. I monitor his blood daily and his normal range is 90-130. A few weeks ago it spiked to 197 and we went to the emergency room. It was also the first time he had ketones. His endocrinologist ran additional tests and says now that while his blood sugar level is at 143 one hour after a high-carb meal and his insulin is +18 (10-17 normal) that he is pre-diabetic. His primary care doctor is testing him for a tumor of the pituitary gland as he also hasn't grown much in the last year ago. He is 3 years old, 26 lbs. and 33 inches. I am 23, 5'00, and 96 lbs. Is this normal? What do all these tests mean? What is pre-diabetes and what should I be doing to prolong it? I am adopted, so I have no family history, but I am not diabetic and I don't believe anyone on his father's side is diabetic either.


I don't wish to be unhelpful but your son's condition sounds quite complex and I wouldn't want to confuse you with inaccurate explanations. Pre-diabetes -- if he does have this -- is a state where the body is able to cope with sugar normally most of the time but if stressed (like he has been) the blood levels rise and there may be some sugar in his urine. Eventually, blood sugar levels rise even without stress and diabetes is diagnosed. However, normal children can have raised sugars in relation to stress, hence my difficulty in giving you sensible advice. What you need to do is to tell your paediatrician or endocrinologist that you don't understand the meaning of all the tests that your son is having done and that you would like an explanation.


Original posting 25 Mar 97


  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:54
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.