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From New Jersey, USA:

I am 28 and 5 feet tall, 90 lbs before pregnancy. I am now in my third trimester of pregnancy and found out I developed gestational diabetes. My 1-hour glucose tolerance test is 169. The 3-hour test is 199, 198 and 180. Are these numbers high or very high?

I followed the diet chart the doctor gave me and lost 4 lbs in less than a week, and I didn't gain any weight the week following that which is now. Is this a good sign? I have gained 25 lbs so far. How many more pounds can I get till the end?

My glucose level is now just below 120 two hours after a meal. Can I eat more to make it closer to 120? Or is the less the better? I ask because a lot of time I still feel hungry. I heard that if I am starving, my fat will be burn into ketones which is no good for the baby. Plus, what cause the early labor for gestational diabetic patients? How much exercise is moderate? Thank you for your time.


The results of the glucose tolerance test are indeed high, but your blood sugar results on your diet appear to be good. You should still expect to gain some weight for a total of 35-40 pounds for the pregnancy. A pregnant woman should not be losing weight. If she is, she should consult with her physician.

Try and keep your 2 hour postmeal blood glucose less than 120 mg/dl. The type of diabetes you have rarely leads to significant ketone production, so that should not be a problem. Also, gestational diabetes does not cause preterm labor. However, you might be delivered early if your baby is becoming too big or you develop complications such as preeclampsia (ask your doctor about this). In terms of exercise, do not overexert yourself. Taking a walk every day or swimming are good forms of exercise that will not stress you or the baby.


Original posting 8 Jun 97


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:54
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