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Question:

I just saw in a recent issue of Prevention Magazine a study performed concerning diabetes and vitamin E. The study was very small (36 people) but the result was that blood glucose levels fell significantly for those people taking 800IU of vitamin E a day. Do you have any evidence of this and if so how many IU's of vitamin E are suggested for a child weighing about 20 kg? The same issue also had an article concerning different plants that aid in diabetes control some being onion, kidney beans, bottle gourd, and one called nopal cactus. It mentions that in some third world countries these are actually used to treat diabetes. Do you have any information on the efficacy of these?

Answer:

There are studies which are providing us with some information on nontraditional supplementation of vitamins to aid in diabetes management. The June 1997 issue of Nutrition and the MD provides a summary of the vitamin E and C information you refer to. It appears that there is some validity in supplementation; however, no one gives levels of supplementation for children. The effect of onion, kidney beans, and cactus is unknown to me, however, I have been asked recently about them. The above mentioned article contains several references for the studies which I have not had time to look at.

JM

Original posting 27 Nov 97

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:54
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