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From Canada:

I'm 13 and I have been diabetic for over two years now and I heard about some guy taking a pill instead of injections. I'm not sure what the announcement was but I would like to find out. I'm telling you this so that if you can, please send me some information about what is going on out there in the research for diabetes. I really appreciate it.


Broadly speaking there are two forms of diabetes. The most common one at your age is called Type 1 Diabetes or IDDM (Insulin Dependant Diabetes Mellitus). As the name suggests, this means treatment with insulin (at least until a good deal more is learned about transplants). The definitive diagnostic test is to see if you have certain antibodies in your blood and you might want to talk to your doctor about this. Although blood sugar testing and injections must be a burden, new insulins, new needles, etc., are making good control much easier and with it the prospect of an essentially normal life.

Some teenagers, especially those of African American or Spanish American descent, have other forms of diabetes that are antibody negative and as far as treatment is concerned can be managed without insulin much like the majority of adult diabetics. In these teenages, excercise and diet are sometimes sufficient to control the diabetes; but sometimes a 'pill' is needed too. These oral medications work in different ways and again you should talk to your doctor.


Original posting 28 Nov 97


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:54
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