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Question:

From Minnesota, USA:

I was diagnosed as a Type 2 five years ago. After a year or so I was re-diagnosed as a Type 1. Was the first diagnosis wrong? Apparently I was creating some insulin at the time but my insulin production decreased to nil over a period of a year or so. Guess this question is: what is the current precise definition of Type 1 versus Type 2? I have always been very sensitive to insulin, 6'0, 175 pounds. Currently on a pump and total daily dose is about 35 units of Humalog.

Answer:

Type 1 diabetes is defined as a disorder of insulin deficiency. Type 2 diabetes is defined as a disorder of insulin resistance (the body makes insulin, but does not respond to it properly.) Some individuals seem to have a combination of both problems, that is they may both have a partial deficiency of insulin and have insulin resistance, especially if they are overweight. It is not uncommon for true Type 1 diabetes to develop slowly in adults so that at first it seems as though they have Type 2 diabetes as they do not have ketones in the urine and may initially be able to control their blood sugar with diet. As their pancreas continues to fail and make less insulin, it may become clear that they truly have Type 1 diabetes.

TGL

Original posting 20 Feb 1998
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:56
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