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From Traverse City, Michigan, USA:

I was diagnosed as a Type 1 diabetic 7 years ago at age 24. At the time of diagnosis I had a C-peptide test and islet-antibody test performed. The C-peptide came back normal and the anti-islet test came back negative (no islet antibodies). I had the tests repeated again 3 years later and finally last month. The results from Mayo clinic are identical. C-peptide in the normal range and negative on the islet antibodies test. My question is what am I? Type 1 or Type 2 or MODY? I have gone to 3 different endocrinologists and received 3 different answers. Currently I am 31, 6 foot 2 inches, and 200 pounds. My A1c are always in the non-diabetic range. I am currently on 15U of lispro and 15U Ultralente taken twice daily, caloric intake is approximately 3500 calories per day. No history of diabetes on either side of the family.


From the story you give you seem to be an insulin dependant antibody negative diabetic. Nowadays you might be termed a Type 1B diabetic as opposed to the Type 1A which have antibodies. This is a group which is common in Hispanic and African American groups; but occurs, albeit much less frequently, in Caucasian families. The fact that you are still needing significant amounts of insulin five years after diagnosis does not exclude this diagnosis; but does make it less probable. Without other clinical features like deafness and a history involving the maternal line, mitochondrial diabetes is unlikely. Finally you could be a MODY3 who may require continuing insulin like a Type 1A.

Unless it irritates you very much, I would concentrate on maintaining the best possible control and try to live without a specific answer. So far you cant get this for Type 1B and it will be a frustrating organising it for MODY3. there are also some very small print indeed possibilities like genetic defects of beta cell function or nutritional damage to the islet cells.

I rather hope that in a few years time there will be a central laboratory that will set up many of these complex diagnostic procedures.


Original posting 17 Mar 1998
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:56
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