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From San Diego, California, USA:

My nephew (age 9) was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes last year. He requires insulin 3 times a day and his parents check his glucose 6 times a day. Despite a rigid diet he has frequent reactions (hypoglycemia)and blood glucose level above 600 at times. About how long does it take to get a stable regimen for glucose levels in children?


It is rare to get a "stable regimen" until growth is finished. In the first few years after diagnosis, the pancreas may still be making insulin, they may slowly (or quickly) stop making insulin. As the pancreas fails, more insulin will be required. In addition, as a child grows, he will need more insulin even if his pancreas is no longer making insulin. Every time there is a change in schedule, the balance between food, exercise, and insulin will have to be reassessed.

Realistically, the goal of strict control in growing children is to minimize both high blood sugars and low blood sugars. It is not realistic to expect all the blood sugars to be normal. If your nephew is having frequent swings from low blood sugars to extremely high blood sugars in the 600's, his regimen needs to be reassessed, by his doctor, dietitian, diabetes educator if available, and possibly a psychologist or social worker.


Original posting 29 Jun 1998
Posted to Daily Care and Blood Tests and Insulin Injections


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:58
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