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From Kimberley , South Africa:


  1. We have a child 3 years old with Type 1 diabetes. When he eats maize-porridge in the mornings with milk (cow), his blood sugar goes up to 26 mmol/l [468 mg/dl]. Why is this? When we substitute the milk with cheese-whey (byproduct of cheese making process), the sugar only goes up to 7 mmol/l [126 mg/dl] with the same insulin dosage. Why the drastic difference?

  2. The child's stomach has been bloated since birth. Is there any correlation between this and the diabetes?

  3. Could we be dealing with a allergic reaction as is evident from the volatile blood sugar levels?


The difference in blood sugars could be due to the fat content of the milk vs. whey. There is a somewhat increased incidence of celiac disease in children with diabetes and I have seen the bloated stomach with allergies. Gluten is the thing to avoid in this condition, however, I have seen children who were also sensitive to milk with this condition.

You do not mention your child has loose stools or frequent stools. Not being able to do a complete diet history it is hard for me to make any real suggestions as to the cause of any of the things you mention. I do feel you should discuss your observations and concerns with your doctor and with a dietitian who is familiar with children and diabetes to see if changes should be made the diet.


Original posting 25 Jul 1998
Posted to Meal Planning, Food and Diet


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:58
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