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From Hamilton, Ontario, Canada:

My 82 year-old father in law was diagnosed about three weeks ago with diabetes. It was suggested the diabetes had gone undiagnosed for a long time. He spent a week in an assessment unit while the right doses of medications were found. He injects himself regularly. I don't know the name of his medications.

He felt well at first with good energy levels. Now, nine days later and approximately 14 days into insulin treatment, his vision has deteriorated quickly. He feels he'll be totally blind in a day or two. What is happening? He must wait for his ophthalmology appointment. But we appreciate any insight you can offer. Why is he losing his vision?


It's not uncommon to hear that a patient's vision gets somewhat or extremely blurry when the blood sugar is brought down from too high to reasonable levels. This blurry vision problem is temporary. I advise my patients to buy cheap magnifying eyeglasses from a drugstore or variety store, and to wait it out.

There's also a possibility, if the patient has had diabetes for many years, that the patient might have diabetic retinopathy, which might worsen when the blood sugars are rapidly and aggressively controlled. But that's unlikely to cause any perceived change in vision, just a change that the ophthalmologist can detect on specialized examination.


Original posting 25 Jul 1998
Posted to Complications


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:58
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