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Question:

From New Jersey, USA:

I have an 11 year old daughter diagnosed with diabetes several months ago. How important is it to keep to regular meal times? Now that summer vacation is here, she likes to sleep in, which means she is eating a good two hours later than when she was in school. This also changes her snack and lunch time.

Answer:

From some practitioners' point of view: Yes, it is important to maintain regular meal times.

From the parent's point of view and reality: If the child was diagnosed only six months ago, I would stick with the assigned meal times because the ability to be flexible with diabetes depends greatly on the amount of experience you have.

Some suggestions:

  • Sleeping in: Give the morning shot at the regular time and have breakfast in bed. Then go back to sleep. We often do this with our daughter and then it doesn't change morning snack and lunch times. The lack of morning activity may effect the noon blood sugar so if you're working with a sliding scale, be aware of this possibility.

  • Late evening meals: Give the dinner shot at the regular time and have your 8:00 pm snack at dinnertime. Have your dinner at the 8:00 pm snacktime.

  • Sometimes, you just have to write "Party" in the log book and deal with some high blood sugars.

You can always let an isolated high blood sugar go, or give a spot dose of insulin as needed. But, never go without eating: low blood sugar is an emergency and should be avoided at all costs.

HVS

Original posting 23 Aug 1998
Posted to Meal Planning, Food and Diet

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:08:58
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