advertisement
 

  Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team
Question:

From New York, USA:

My 6 1/2 year old son was diagnosed 3 months ago with type 1. Most of the time he is very good at getting the injections, but other times he gets very upset and says he doesn't want to do it. When we finally do it then he says he won't eat. How should we deal with this?

Answer:

What your child is going through is quite common. Children at this age require attention, and they want it even if it's in a "bad" way. In other words, when he fights his injections, or won't eat, he has your complete and undivided attention: even if it is in a tense situation.

Some suggestions. First, the shots must be given! Make sure he understands that this is not an option, no matter how much of a fuss he puts up. Second, ignore it when he won't eat. If he goes unconscious from hypoglycemia, use glucagon. Another thing that might help is that since his diabetes is so new, he probably feels like this is all you pay attention to. Try to set aside about a half an hour a day where your whole world is focused on him. No mention of food, shots, blood sugars, or anything to do with diabetes. This might be reading a book together or something like that. Just make sure that diabetes is not involved at all.

JW

Additional comments from Lois Schmidt Finney, diabetes dietitian:

More ideas: use points on a calendar and then have those add up to some reward when he has done well with shots for a week. I think a movie or favorite game might be a good incentive. Another thought is if Humalog is used, it can be given after the meal when you see what is or is not eaten. This lots of times takes some of the power away from him. Lastly, are there parent support groups in your area?

LSF

[Editor's comment: I second the recommendation to use Humalog. Injecting after meals based on food consumed removes both the power of eating as a manipulative tool and the stress you feel worrying about hypoglycemia. JSH]

Original posting 4 Sep 1998
Posted to Blood Tests and Insulin Injections

  
advertisement


                 
  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:00
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.