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Question:

From British Columbia, Canada:

  1. I'd like to know why the test strips cost a lot of money.
  2. Is watermelon okay to eat?
  3. Is Honey Nut Cheerios okay to eat?
  4. Is it okay if I overeat after a needle?
  5. I just got diabetes a few days ago. When will I need I bigger needle (I'm using 3/10 right now)?
  6. What if I get depressed? How can I help that?

Answer:

It sounds like you have a lot of questions about diabetes. I would first encourage you to find a health care team that includes an endocrinologist, dietitian, nurse and counselor. Diabetes can be quite overwhelming without someone to help guide you through the issues. To answer a few of your questions, not knowing the details of your diabetes:

  1. I cannot answer why test strips cost so much, except to say that a great deal of product research and analysis goes into each type of strip, so the companies that develop them get reimbursed for their research as well as their product. The quality control on manufacturing strips is also very high, so production can be expensive. We certainly make a lot of decisions based on the results the strips provide us with.

  2. Watermelon is allowed. It is a fruit. 1 1/4 cups is considered 15 grams of carbohydrate or a fruit exchange.

  3. Honey Nut Cheerios are allowed as well. 1/2 cup equals 15 grams of carbohydrate.

  4. If you eat more than is on your meal plan, and you did not take enough insulin to cover it, your blood sugar will be high.

  5. The amount of insulin you take will dictate what needle size you will need to use. The amount of insulin you will need will be determined by many factors and may vary depending on your age, how long you have had diabetes, etc.

  6. Depression should be addressed immediately. Tell your doctor and he/she will be able to help you find a counselor to help.

JM

Additional comments from Dr. Quick:

The amount of insulin does not determine needle size. It determines the size of syringe. Needle size is more based on comfort -- some folks swear that the short needles are the least painful and others feel they bruise more and are not willing to use them.

WWQ

Original posting 13 Sep 1998
Posted to Blood Tests and Insulin Injections and Meal Planning, Food and Diet

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:00
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