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From Michigan City, Indiana, USA:

My daughter has been a type 1 diabetic for 2 years. She has just started middle school and was told all testing must be done in the office. She goes low very quickly and has always been able to test in the classroom at her seat discreetly. I am very concerned about this as her walk to the office is quite a distance. I have reviewed the IEP laws but nothing is very clear about classroom testing. Our doctor has wrote a letter that her testing supples should be on her or with the teacher. Can you please give me some insight on this delicate situation and what the laws and my rights concerning this are?


Safe care in the school is critical for your child. First, from the school's perspective, they may require equipment to be kept in the nurse's office. I have had a few patients who have had their equipment used by other students when it was left in a backpack. The school is concerned about needles and lancets. To keep your child safe, you could start to treat the low in the classroom, and have another person accompany your child to the nurse's office to verify the blood sugar.


Additional comments from The Editor:

I feel very strongly that children should be allowed to test in the classroom, if that is the parents' wish. This is especially important if the health clinic is far away from the classroom. Children with asthma who are having an asthma attack are not required to walk to a clinic to use their inhaler. Why should children with diabetes be required to walk to a clinic to test their blood sugar if they feel low? The danger to the child is similar in both cases. Regardless of where your child tests, someone must always accompany your child to the clinic.

For additional information and links to resources, see Diabetes at School.


Original posting 29 Sep 1998
Posted to Social Issues: School and Daycare


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:00
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