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From Portland, Oregon, USA:

I am 50 years old with Type 2 diabetes. The medication I take always comes with a "low dose alert" notice from the pharmacy and seems not so effective in keeping blood sugar low since I started taking estrogen. I'm not overweight and I exercise. Should I push the doctor to change medications?


Your goals for control are to get your fasting blood glucose between 80-120 most of the time and a hemoglobin A1c of 7% or less. If you haven't reached these goals for control, you should definitely have a discussion with your doctor regarding a change in medication. The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study just completed found that a reduction of the Hemoglobin A1c from 7.9 to 7% resulted in a 25% reduction in developing eye or kidney disease, 25% reduction in diabetes related deaths and reduced cardiovascular events. You should let your doctor know about the study and let him or her know that you are interested in getting into good control.

Have you been to see a diabetes educator? You may also want to ask for a referral to a diabetes educator to see if there are some additional care activities to help you live healthy with diabetes.


Original posting 24 Jan 1999
Posted to Medications: Pills for Diabetes


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:02
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