Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team

From St. Clair Shores, Michigan, USA:

I am a 13 year old with diabetes. I have been diabetic for 2 months and I am curious about a reading I have gotten. When I go to the diabetic specialist, he gives me a paper saying my results. It said I had no ketones, protein, or glucose in the urine. However it did say that pH was 5. What is pH? Is that a normal level? The doctor said nothing about it, and my father who has been diabetic for 35 years didn't know what it meant. Can you tell me?


I'm really proud of you for being so observant. The doctor is using a dip stick that looks at lots of things in the urine. pH is a measure of the acid/base balance. Most people are able to concentrate acid in the urine. A pH of 5 means your kidneys are working just fine in the acid/base balance. It is healthy and normal.

pH is measured from 0-14 with very strong acids having the lower number and very strong bases the higher numbers. You can look all of this up on the Internet, now that I've given you a start.


Additional comments from Dr. Quick:

pH can also be measured in the blood. The blood's pH is usually about 7.4, although in the complication called diabetic ketoacidosis it may be as low as about 7.0 or so.


Original posting 25 Apr 1999
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms


  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:02
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.