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Question:

From Yahoo:

I have been to the doctor, and I was diagnosed with diabetes. He told me there were three different types that I might have but didn't explain them in detail. Could you please give me some information about each of the three please?

Answer:

There are two main types of diabetes, and a less common third one.

Type 1 diabetes is one in which insulin is started almost straight away, and is known as an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks parts of itself and destroys the insulin producing cells in the pancreas.

Type 2 diabetes can often be initially controlled with diet and tablets which improves the body's ability to utilise available insulin and make it more efficient. Often in this group, patients are overweight and the body is more resistant to the effects of insulin. Older people often develop this type of diabetes.

The third and less common group is found in young adults in whom the diabetes can be controlled by diet and tablets. There is often a strong genetic factor causing this type.

If you want to include a fourth type, there is a type of diabetes called gestational diabetes which can occur during pregnancy and occasionally needs treating with insulin. However, only a pregnant woman can develop this.

JS

DTQ-ONC19990526
Original posting 22 Aug 1999
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:06
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