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Question:

From Woodstock, Georgia, USA:

My 8 year old daughter was diagnosed 1.5 months ago. Yesterday, we got her up and gave NPH and Regular. Her blood level was 114. At breakfast, she would not eat. I checked her again. Her blood sugar was 82. She was almost comatose. She couldn't eat, drink, or walk. I let her sleep for 10 minutes and then gave her juice. Her sugar level was now 39. She would jerk and barely swallow. Within 15 minutes, she was coming around, and after 30 minutes was back to her normal self without remembering anything. Why did this happen when she was at a normal level?

Answer:

With regards to your question regarding sudden coma and 'normal' blood sugar level, I must remind first of all you that home meters are not accurate enough to distinguish the difference between 10 mg/dl changes in blood sugar. Furthermore, capillary blood sugar levels are a little bit higher than arterial levels (which matter in terms of cerebral supply to the brain tissues which only depends on sugar levels for functions such as memory: this lack can explain why she didn't remember anything). Last but not least, part of the problem with just two readings is you don't know if the blood sugar level before the morning shot has been reasonably steady over the dawn time before, or if it was slowly dropping still.

MS

DTQ-20000426150804
Original posting 22 Jun 2000
Posted to Honeymoon

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:10
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