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Question:

From Campton, Kentucky, USA:

Last week the endocrinologist said that medically anyone who has two random sugar testings 200 mg/dl [11.1 mmol/L] or over are considered diabetic. My son has had several high readings, way over 200 mg/dl [11.1 mmol/L] that eventually return to normal. Occasional lows are now becoming a problem. Does this sound like the typical onset of typeá1 diabetes? I thought that, if you had diabetes, you only had hypoglycemia if you were receiving insulin injections. The endocrinologist suggests that my son is in a honeymoon period. Have you ever heard of such an onset of type 1 diabetes?

I have noticed that most of his high sugar readings are when he is sick with a virus, etc. It has been as high as 496 mg/dl [27.6 mmol/L] and 356 mg/dl [19.8 mmol/L] recorded at the doctor's office, and it was 26 mg/dl [1.4 mmol/L] one morning at the doctor's office, but he was not fasting. They told me to feed him and come back 30 minutes later and it registered 260 mg/dl [14.4 mmol/L].

No one really knows what to make of it. I just know that I stay uptight and anxious all the time. He does have some important lab work coming back this week. He was tested for the islet cell antibodies and the anti-GAD antibody. They should be in later in the week. I would still like your input on what you think may be happening to my son.

Answer:

If your son has times of high blood sugars and low blood sugars, he has a problem with how his body handles glucose or sugar. The most common form of disease that would result in high blood sugars in children is typeá1 (autoimmune) diabetes. It would be a little more unusual for low blood sugars to be a significant problem in the early stages of yet unrecognized type 1 diabetes.

Quite clearly, your son is having a problem with glucose (sugar) metabolism. That problem will best be dealt with by a pediatric endocrinologist, and I would suggest you redirect your questions to that individual for a thorough answer that is beyond the purview of this forum.

MSB

DTQ-20010123220124
Original posting 31 Jan 2001
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:18
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