Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team

From the Slovak Republic:

What is the likelihood of my child having diabetes as an adult if she was having diabetic fetopathy as a newborn?


The term "diabetic fetopathy'" is not one that I am familiar with, but I am going to assume that this refers either to what is usually called neonatal diabetes in North America or possibly to being the infant of a mother who has diabetes.

Neonatal diabetes is a very rare condition. about 1400,000 births. About half of these children get better in a few months, and some of these can be predicted because they have a condition called paternal disomy on chromosome 6, about one quarter will have diabetes permanently, and the remaining quarter may initially become insulin independent, but develop diabetes again in the early adult years.

If you can get to a medical library, you will find a very good review of this in The New England Journal of Medicine, Vol 333; page 704, in Sept. 1995: Postprandial versus preprandial blood glucose monitoring in women with gestational diabetes mellitus requiring insulin therapy, de Veciana M, Major CA, Morgan MA, Asrat T, Toohey JS, Lien JM, Evans AT, or you can review the abstract on-line. Very few studies have been done on the long term outcome for infants of diabetic mothers. Such as they are show minimal evidence of insulin resistance, but essentially the long term outlook is excellent.


Original posting 19 Feb 2001
Posted to Research: Causes and Prevention


  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:18
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.