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From San Jose, California, USA:

My husband is a dialysis patient and is currently having his blood sugar monitored because diabetes runs in his family. How many people actually do glucose monitoring at home? This may be a possibility in our future and I am curious to find out how critical it is to monitor the glucose levels, how often this should be done and how many patients actually do the monitoring.


It is my contention that every patient with diabetes should perform home glucose monitoring, if they are able to do so. The frequency of monitoring is dependent upon the clinical situation. Those with the poorest results and the most complicated regimens should perform more. However, even the patient with well-controlled diabetes should monitor occasionally to make sure things are going ok. This is because patients with type 2 diabetes often have changes in their control over time that require changes in their medical regimen. It takes about 15 minutes a day. My feeling is that the dividends are well worth the hassle. I can also say that those patients who do not monitor often have the worst control.


[Editor's comment: People on dialyisis often run low hematocirts which can alter the results on home blood glucose meters. In choosing a meter, look at its specifications and be sure it covers the hematocrit range your husband is in. SS]

Original posting 24 Feb 2001
Posted to Blood Tests and Insulin Injections


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:18
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