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Question:

From West Frankfort, Illinois, USA:

I am 35 years old, and I have had type 2 diabetes for a year and a half. I have lost 90 pounds and have not had a fasting blood sugar over 100 mg/dl [5.5 mmol/L] for over a year (without taking any oral hypoglycemic agents).

Today, I had a grapefruit for breakfast and rode my bike about three miles to the bank. While I was in the bank, I became diaphoretic, slightly nauseated, and felt "funny". I checked my blood sugar when I arrived home, and it was 116 mg/dl [6.4 mmol/L] without having eaten anything. Could this have been hypoglycemia? Does the body spontaneously correct hypoglycemia or was this something else?

Answer:

First, congratulations on your successful weight loss and wonderful blood sugar response!

The symptoms you describe certainly sound like a low blood sugar, but without actually testing the blood, it's hard to say from where I sit. Certainly, if you are having more of these episodes, it would be good to carry your meter with you to see and also carry some glucose tablets just in case.

Yes, your body does work to protect you from the blood sugar going too low. Your body releases sugar from the muscle and liver as well as decreases the amount of insulin it is producing at that time all in an attempt to balance the blood sugar back to normal. If you continue to have these type of episodes after a carbohydrate meal, my suggestion would be to add some protein and fiber with the carbohydrate to slow the blood sugar rise, thus lowering the amount of insulin produced at one time. Many times, low blood sugar happens when the pancreas has pooped out and over responds when the blood sugar goes up after a carbohydrate meal.

I wish you continued success on your weight and exercise plan.

KS

DTQ-20010202115526
Original posting 1 Mar 2001
Posted to Hypoglycemia

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:18
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