advertisement
 

  Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team
Question:

From Lindenhurst, New York, USA:

My five year old daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about nine months ago. She is on NPH and Regular at breakfast and NPH at bedtime. We give her Humalog according to a sliding scale, if her blood glucose level is 300 mg/dl [16.7 mmol/L] or over. On the whole, she is sticking to her plan, but she will on occasion eat a lot, and we try to compensate (especially at dinnertime) with more insulin.

For the past week, she seems to have fallen into a pattern of starting out the day either low or in her target range, and then gradually increasing her blood sugar level throughout the day to over 400 mg/dl [22.3 mmol/L] at bedtime.

Any suggestions? Should we talk to our endocrinologist about adjusting her sliding scale so we would give her insulin if she's over 200 mg/dl [11.1 mmol/L]? (Sometimes I think, if we did that, she wouldn't have ended up so high at the end of the day.) Are there certain types of foods that we should try to avoid?

Answer:

My first question would be to ask if your daughter is going low in the night and you are seeing the rise on the way up to very high levels later in the morning. Be sure of that first. You may also be seeing the end of the honeymoon after nine months of diabetes and her insulin needs have changed. Do see her doctor.

LD

DTQ-20010309115112
Original posting 27 Mar 2001
Posted to Daily Care

  
advertisement


                 
  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:20
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.