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Question:

From Belleville, Illinois, USA:

My daughter wanted a candy bar the other day, the total carbs were about two servings which is what she is allowed for her snack, but it had 30 grams of sugar. She normally eats Teddy Grahams for her snack with the same number of servings, and the sugar count for those is 8 grams. I decided to let her have the candy bar to see what would happen to her dinnertime numbers (we had a bet that I said she would be high, and she said it would be within her normal range), and she was not any higher than normal. Does this mean that the sugar count does not really matter as long as the carbohydrates are the same? This was her first chocolate bar since being diagnosed almost three months ago, and she was in heaven. If this is allowed once in awhile, she sure would be happy!

Answer:

Yes, with regard to how nutrients affect blood sugar, all carbs are equal. Sugar does not affect the blood sugar any differently than other carbohydrates. Other nutrients in combination with sugar may make a difference on blood sugar such as fat which may slow down the digestive process and cause the sugar to enter the blood stream later after insulin has had its peak. Fiber may also slow down the absorption of sugar.

Basically, an occasional candy bar goes a long way to satisfy the hunger for a real treat and may help keep people from binging off the meal plan when they know they can have something sweet to satisfy a craving. As you know sugar does not provide much nutrition, and that is why it is in the smallest part of the Food Guide Pyramid for everyone.

JM

DTQ-20010710011059
Original posting 25 Jul 2001
Posted to Meal Planning, Food and Diet

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:24
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