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Question:

From Brookhaven, Pennsylvania, USA:

I have had type 2 diabetes for 10 years which I was able to control with diet and exercise until about a year ago when I herniated two discs in my lower back which eventually required surgery. Ever since my injury, I have had wide swings in blood sugar (from 90-225 mg/dl [5-12.5 mmol/L] fasting and 100-275 mg/dl [5.5-15.3 mmol/L] four hours after meals), and my hemoglobin A1c has gone from 6.4 to 7.3% in the last six months. I take a diabetes pills and eat what I am supposed to, but I do have a strenuous job. Could this be related to the poor pain control that I have over my now chronic back condition? What would be your suggestions?

Answer:

I would agree that it is a strong possibility that the stress of the job and the injury could be causing you to have higher blood sugars. Unfortunately, it does not sound like the pain or the job stress will go away. I would suggest a plan to deal with both. Treatment might include stress management, better pain control, an increase in exercise (if possible), and a change in medication if sugars still remain elevated.

Please note that diabetes control is a fluid situation. Requirements may go up over time. That's why you do the monitoring. Don't be stuck in the past, in terms of what a previous medical regimen accomplished. If you need more therapy, you need to pursue it. Good luck!

JTL

DTQ-20010917233237
Original posting 23 Sep 2001
Posted to Daily Care

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:26
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