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Question:

From Atlanta, Georgia, USA:

My 20 year old nephew was just told by his doctor that his protein level is too high, and he was given a prescription. (Unfortunately, I did not get the name of the drug.) He will go back in 30 days for another check up.

He is physically fit, not overweight, works out three to four times a week and eats rather well since he is in college studying to be a chef. Are there any vitamins or diet programs he should try? Is there any record of anyone getting this condition under control with diet and vitamin supplements?

Answer:

Unfortunately, there are no easy answers. However, there are prescription medications which really help. For instance, when the microalbumin rises to elevated levels in the urine, a medication from the class of drugs called ACE inhibitors is used. These medications have been shown to delay or prevent progression of kidney complications from diabetes.

It is a good idea to repeat the urine albumin because of high intra-individual variation in the same person in the measurement of urine albumin. Blood pressure, in general is critical. Good blood sugar control is also helpful. No vitamins or supplements have been shown to be effective. Protein restriction has been shown to be helpful when the kidney dysfunction is advanced.

JTL

[Editor's comment: Also, see How to Protect your Kidneys at the Diabetes Monitor. WWQ]

DTQ-20020302180450
Original posting 20 Mar 2002
Posted to Complications

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:32
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