advertisement
 

  Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team
Question:

From Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA:

When recently meeting with our diabetes team, we were told that exercise during the presence of ketones in the urine is dangerous. Is this so? If so, why?

Answer:

Ketones are an "alternative fuel" during the metabolism of body fat. The issue of ketosis is that excessive ketones can "build up" and lead to the dangerous, and possibly fatal, DKA [diabetic ketoacidosis] which can cause brain swelling and usually is associated with severe nausea and vomiting.

Heavy, hard, exercise, can lead to a degree of acid production, and if there is not adequate sugar, can also be associated with a degree of ketosis for fuel. So the concern is that if someone already has some ketosis, exercise may be "too much for the body to handle." Frankly however, I think people have to use common sense. If there is only a trace or small ketones, then I generally do not restrict my patients from having fun with general play/activities/exercise. I ask them to assure hydration. If they are very competitive athletes on the basketball or soccer or water polo team (or other games that don't have built-in pauses, like football or baseball), then I think ketones should be pretty much cleared before heavy participation.

Other pediatric endocrinologists may feel differently about this. You should abide by the directions of your diabetes team.

DS

DTQ-20020506103209
Original posting 28 May 2002
Posted to Exercise and Sports

  
advertisement


                 
  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:34
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.