advertisement
 

  Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team
Question:

From New York, USA:

Our four year old daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about five months ago, and we have had trouble, for brief periods, controlling her blood glucose but always manage to regain control in less than a week. At worst case she runs 200-300 mg/dl [11.1-16.7 mmol/L] for three to four days in a row. How significant is this to her long term health?

Answer:

Having a brief run of higher glucoses likely has little, if any, long term health effects. Indeed, the higher glucose readings may indicated an important short-term issue, being the heralding of DKA [diabetic ketoacidosis] which can be very serious or even fatal. That is why many centers suggest to families that when the blood glucose of a child with type 1 diabetes is greater than 240 mg/dl [13.3mmol/L] (especially two readings about fours hours apart), or during illness (particularly one with vomiting), that ketones be checked for either in the urine or in the blood!

There are some studies in adults suggesting that higher glucose readings right after meals may be an issue, even if the other, pre-meal glucose readings and/or the hemoglobin A1c values are acceptable. This has not been studied well in children.

DS

Additional comments from Dr. John Schulga:

It sounds like you are doing really well with your child. It is felt that short periods of high readings are not detrimental to long term complications. It is the overall control that is important.

JS

DTQ-20020807202331A
Original posting 14 Aug 2002
Posted to Daily Care

  
advertisement


                 
  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:38
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.