advertisement
 

  Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team
Question:

From Tell City, Indiana, USA:

My 14 year old daughter (height: 5 feet; weight: 94 pounds) had a blood sugar of about 145 mg/dl [13.6 mmol/L] when she was sick after she had just finished drinking a 16 ounce bottle of orange juice, so her doctor did a three-hour oral GTT. The results were:

   Time        Blood Glucose   
4% 65 mg/dl [3.6 mmol/L]
fasting 102 mg/dl [5.7 mmol/L]
one-half hour 230 mg/dl [12.8 mmol/L]
one hour 169 mg/dl [9.4 mmol/L]
two hours 138 mg/dl [7.7 mmol/L]
three hours 114 mg/dl [6.3 mmol/L]

The doctor said that she has borderline diabetes (which I believe is now called prediabetes) and suggested diet, exercise, and a retest in three months. However, everything that I have read has told me that she should have been given 50 or 75 grams of glucose, and that the maximum for a child is 75 grams, but she was given 100 grams of glucose. Could the 100 grams of glucose her one-half hour blood glucose was so high? Wouldn't this make a difference in the results? Do you think I should have the OGTT done again with 50 or 75 grams?

I have asked the doctor him the same questions I'm asking you, and he really could not say for sure if the 100 gram would have made a difference or not. He told me he would read up on it, but said someone without diabetes would never have blood glucose over 200 mg/dl [11.1 mmol/L] no mater how much sugar intake they had. Is that true? Hope you can help me with this.

Answer:

Ah yes, the vagaries of the oral glucose tolerance test! That's why most don't rely on it for diagnosing diabetes. I rarely do them for all the reasons you say.

That said, I would worry about a 102 mg/dl [5.7 mmol/L] fasting level more than anything else. It is too high and bears watching. Likewise, 138 mg/dl [7.7 mmol/L] at two hours seems high to me too, but it might be dark by the amount of glucose, etc.

I wouldn't do another OGTT, but I would monitor blood glucose at home (some fasting and some postprandial). One can do years of glucoses for the cost of the GTT.

LD

DTQ-20021008104000
Original posting 24 Oct 2002
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
advertisement


                 
  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:38
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.