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From Tell City, Indiana, USA:

My 14 year old daughter (height: 5 feet; weight: 94 pounds) had a blood sugar of about 145 mg/dl [13.6 mmol/L] when she was sick after she had just finished drinking a 16 ounce bottle of orange juice, so her doctor did a three-hour oral GTT. The results were:

   Time        Blood Glucose   
4% 65 mg/dl [3.6 mmol/L]
fasting 102 mg/dl [5.7 mmol/L]
one-half hour 230 mg/dl [12.8 mmol/L]
one hour 169 mg/dl [9.4 mmol/L]
two hours 138 mg/dl [7.7 mmol/L]
three hours 114 mg/dl [6.3 mmol/L]

The doctor said that she has borderline diabetes (which I believe is now called prediabetes) and suggested diet, exercise, and a retest in three months. However, everything that I have read has told me that she should have been given 50 or 75 grams of glucose, and that the maximum for a child is 75 grams, but she was given 100 grams of glucose. Could the 100 grams of glucose her one-half hour blood glucose was so high? Wouldn't this make a difference in the results? Do you think I should have the OGTT done again with 50 or 75 grams?

I have asked the doctor him the same questions I'm asking you, and he really could not say for sure if the 100 gram would have made a difference or not. He told me he would read up on it, but said someone without diabetes would never have blood glucose over 200 mg/dl [11.1 mmol/L] no mater how much sugar intake they had. Is that true? Hope you can help me with this.


Ah yes, the vagaries of the oral glucose tolerance test! That's why most don't rely on it for diagnosing diabetes. I rarely do them for all the reasons you say.

That said, I would worry about a 102 mg/dl [5.7 mmol/L] fasting level more than anything else. It is too high and bears watching. Likewise, 138 mg/dl [7.7 mmol/L] at two hours seems high to me too, but it might be dark by the amount of glucose, etc.

I wouldn't do another OGTT, but I would monitor blood glucose at home (some fasting and some postprandial). One can do years of glucoses for the cost of the GTT.


Original posting 24 Oct 2002
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:38
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