Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team

From Cairo, Egypt:

My 10 year old son is on three shots per day of Actrapid [Regular] and Insulatard [NPH], but recently his pediatrician advised us to switch to Lantus once daily instead of the Insulatard in addition to three shots of Actrapid with meals. However, I read that Lantus regulates the rate of growth of children. Could you give me your opinion?


I can find no clinical evidence to support the idea that Lantus (insulin glargine) interferes with the normal growth pattern, and certainly this long acting insulin has come to be used very widely in the U.S. I rather think that this idea may have started from the observation that glargine, like insulin, gets attached to IGF1BP, Insulin like Growth Factor-1 Binding Protein, and might therefore be supposed to interfere with the action of that hormone. However, there have been several studies that have shown the interference of glargine with IGF1BP is quite small and certainly not enough to contraindicate the use of glargine.

If you do switch your son to Lantus, you might also talk to his pediatrician about switching at the same time from Actrapid to NovoRapid. The latter is a very quick acting insulin which, like Humalog, can be given at meal times with the dose adjusted to appetite and premeal blood sugar.


Original posting 18 Mar 2003
Posted to Insulin Analogs


  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:42
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.