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Question:

From London, United Kingdom:

My five year old has become so opposed to his blood sugar testing that it is a physical fight to test him. I have to hold his foot (the only place he will let me test anyway), in a lock under my arm, while he screams and tries to pull away. I feel so exhausted by the end of it, and so upset. I don't want him to "win" as this is too important an issue to let slide and address when he is older. Recently, when he has been tested in public, as he was exhibiting symptoms of a low, his performance was such that security was called and we were asked to leave. As this was a children's hospital, I really feel at my wit's end.

I have tried all the "test Teddy/Mummy/Daddy first" routines, threats and bribes, all to no avail. I have got a new monitor with a less painful lancet but he prefers the old one. Is there anything to help explain it to him? What can I do next?

Answer:

The most important thing you can do to help your son and the entire family is to see a psychologist or other mental health professional with experience working with young children with diabetes. You need to get some specific and immediate strategies to use with your son. Please ask your son's diabetes team and/or pediatrician for recommendations and referrals.

JWB

DTQ-20030528220618
Original posting 31 May 2003
Posted to Blood Tests and Insulin Injections

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:46
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