advertisement
 

  Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team
Question:

From Cleveland, Ohio, USA:

My 16 month old grandson has been having some problems lately that I'm concerned about. He has only gained three ounces in three months, has been to the doctor and hospital about five to six times in last few months for ear infections and yeast type infections of his penis which I thought may have been from the antibiotics he was on, but now I wonder. He has loss of appetite, becomes very fussy and picky, irritable, and I noticed yesterday he was extremely thirsty and screamed for a bottle of water I was holding and gulped it like he had been on a desert island. He would eat half a watermelon if you gave it to him. He has just become a irritable baby with fewer and fewer good days whereas he was such a calm sweet baby until about six weeks ago.

I hate to say this but something clicked in my woman's intuition and said to check out diabetes.Call me a quirky old grandma but I just had to check out what I was feeling, I'm concerned that his doctors (who only sees him for 10 minutes every three months) was not concerned about his three ounce weight gain in three months. How on earth can you diagnose a 16 month old for diabetes? What would the symptoms in a 16 month old who can't communicate what is bothering him be?

Answer:

The symptoms of diabetes (thirst, excessive urine and weight loss) are the same at any age and the diagnosis is made when there are fasting blood glucoses over 126 mg/dl [7 mmol/L] on two separate occasions. or random blood glucoses over 200 mg/dl [11.1 mmol/L]. This is very easy to do, so mom and dad should ask about checking his blood sugar level.

LD

DTQ-20030608232114
Original posting 18 Jun 2003
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
advertisement


                 
  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:46
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.