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Question:

From Los Angeles, California, USA:

My 14 month old daughter has been drinking what I think is a lot of water, but since she is in diapers, I can't tell if she's urinating more frequently or not. She will drink about 24 ounces of water in a single sitting, if we let her. I worry that she is showing signs of diabetes. She is continuing to thrive and isn't losing any weight that I can tell. My daycare provider tells me that she hasn't noticed any problems, and she thinks that it's the novelty of the water that my daughter enjoys, but my daughter is only one of four children she watches during the day.

I am 31 years old and have type 2 diabetes (diagnosed four years ago) so I would like to do a finger stick test on her, with my monitor, but I don't know what the normal glucose readings of a 14 month old are. What is the normal volume of water a 14 month old infant should be taking in? What is the normal glucose reading of a child this small?

Answer:

This sounds like classical habit drinking to me. I would restrict intake to six to eight ounces at a time. If the problem persists, then consult a doctor rather than engage in home diagnosis.

KJR

[Editor's comment: Please see Classification and Diagnosis of Diabetes. The values for blood sugars for kids are about the same as for adults. Two or more elevated values (measured on a laboratory machine, not a home meter) are sufficient to make a diagnosis of diabetes. If after reading this information, you suspect that your child has diabetes, you should see a medical professional as soon as possible. This means in days, not weeks or months. WWQ]

DTQ-20030604181019
Original posting 3 Jul 2003
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:46
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