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Question:

From Colorado, USA:

We recently spent some time with my 10 year old nephew who has diabetes and recently received an insulin pump. My concern is that the family does not appear to monitor his diet anymore. He eats what he wants and is constantly bolusing. He actually ate more pure sugar than most kids who do not have diabetes would. We were at a party where there was a cotton candy machine, and he ate at least six within a hour, and he roasted and ate about a half a bag of marshmallows, etc. Every time we saw him, he was eating some kind of candy. At one point, his glucose level was 265 mg/dl [14.7 mmol/L] before bolusing.

His parents say he can eat what ever he wants and appear to place no limits which would be expected for a healthy diet for a child who does not have diabetes. Is this attitude of nonstop sugar followed by frequent insulin bolusing healthy for him?

Answer:

It is important at all times to maintain a healthy diet. This includes getting plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and dairy products. It is desirable to avoid simple sugars which should be replaced with non-sugar substitutes when possible. However, an occasional treat is perfectly fine. In his case, a few roasted marshmallows would be fine, but half of a bag seems excessive.

MSB

DTQ-20030705124822
Original posting 18 Jul 2003
Posted to Daily Care

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:46
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