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Question:

From Amherst, Virginia, USA:

I have had type 1 diabetes going on 27 years. When I was nine years old, I was struck in my lower chest area by a snowmobile, thrown through the air about 50 feet, and knocked unconscious. After coming to, I could walk and all with no problems, but, days later, developed severe lower chest pains, where I had trouble breathing. These would come and go, finally stopping altogether. Approximately one year later, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Could this traumatic event have actually damaged my pancreatic activity? My pancreas was tested several times and I was told it was producing NO insulin at all. A recent test this year proved otherwise. According to the test, I have pancreatic function, with a C-peptide of insulin of a 0.62. What does this mean and will it increase more?

Answer:

It is unlikely that the accident you were involved in is the reason you developed type 1 diabetes. The C-peptide test is an indication of your ability to secrete insulin. The value of 0.62 is fairly low and is consistent with type 1 diabetes. It indicates that your ability to secrete insulin is low. Insulin therapy will be required indefinitely. Sometimes there is a very small amount of insulin secretion that persists. However, this residual function is not enough to keep you from needing insulin therapy.

JTL

DTQ-20040413011443
Original posting 28 Apr 2004
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:56
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