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Question:

From Gas City, Indiana, USA:

My son recently underwent a five hour glucose tolerance test. The doctor told me it was slightly low and had a rounded curve. She explained it as being hypoglycemic and told me the only thing to do was change his diet to high protein, five or six meals a day and not a lot of sweets and snacks.

I went today and bought a blood sugar kit to test his blood sugar myself, to keep track of how it does. Today was the first day I used it. Before breakfast, it was 57 mg/dl [3.2 mmol/L]. After breakfast, it was 60 mg/dl [3.3 mmol/L]. After lunch, it was 95 mg/dl [5.3 mmol/L]. Before supper, it was 68 mg/dl [3.8 mmol/L]. After supper, it was 146 mg/dl [8.1 mmol/L] and a few hours later, it was 159 mg/dl [8.3 mmol/L].

What I don't understand is that he showed no symptoms of his blood sugar being too low. Is this normal or is it something I should talk to my doctor about? I don't even know what a normal level should be for a 56 1/2 pound seven year old boy should be. The pharmacist said that 80 to 120 mg/dl [4.4 to 6.7 mmol/L] was normal for adults. What should it be for my son?

Answer:

Your son does not have diabetes so we can't offer specific advice. However, you haven't said why your son was having a prolonged glucose tolerance test in the first place. It sounds to me like he is a normal boy, but you should seek an adequate explanation of the results from the doctor who conducted the study.

KJR

DTQ-20040731231509
Original posting 7 Aug 2004
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms and Hypoglycemia

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:58
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