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Question:

From Canada:

I took a one hour glucose screening test at 28 weeks pregnant. I ate immediately before the test, including a couple of small chocolates. I was told this was not a problem. The test required that I drink a glucose beverage and my blood was drawn exactly one hour later. I was called back because my glucose level was 8.1 mmol/L [146 mg/dl]. I was informed the cut off was 7.8mmol/L [140 mg/dl], not 6.7mmol/L [121 mg/dl].

I went in a week later for a glucose tolerance test. I fasted for 10 hours before the test. My blood was drawn before I ingested another glucose beverage. A blood test was also administered at one hour, then two hours after I had the beverage.

When I went to see my obstetrician a few days later, he informed me that all three readings from the glucose tolerance test had come back perfectly normal and that I did not have gestational diabetes. I have never been overweight, and I have not gained excessive weight during this pregnancy (20 pounds at 32 weeks). And, yet, I have felt funny after eating foods such as dessert, a white bagel or even a banana, the dessert being the worst offender.

Do I have glucose issues? Am I at higher risk for type 2 diabetes?

Answer:

It sounds like your doctor did all the right tests and you did not have gestational diabetes. If you "fail" the one hour screen, as you did, you should go on to take the full glucose tolerance test, which you did. I don't know why you are feeling the way you do. My suggestion to you is to wait until after you have your baby and your body returns to normal and see if your symptoms persist. If they do, see your primary care doctor.

JS

DTQ-20040816225507
Original posting 22 Aug 2004
Posted to Other

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:58
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