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From New Jersey, USA:

My two year old daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes on July 4, 2004. She uses an insulin pump and is doing very well. Recently, she has been waking up in the middle of the night crying that her piggies (toes) were hurting her. She would explain that bugs were nipping at her toes. There are no bugs, but I assume the sensation must be pins and needles. I would rub her legs to get the circulation going until she would fall back asleep. She lies flat on the bed to sleep and her sugar levels are normal when this happens. The disruptions have been going for four nights now. I contacted my pediatric endocrinologist who said it has no correlation to my daughter's diabetes. She didn't really make comment for other possibilities either. I have read that people who are diabetic sometime experience tingling and/or numbing of the feet and sometimes need get them amputated. The thought of this frightens me. I am fielding for a second opinion on my daughter's foot problem.


I can unequivocally set your mind at rest that your daughter's problem with her toes will absolutely not lead to her needing amputation. I agree with her pediatrician that it is almost certainly nothing to do with her diabetes either. Pins and needles are quite common and for a young child and may be puzzling or frightening. Does she wear socks in bed? If so, take them off. Does she use a hot water bottle? If so, remove it. Don't worry, the problem will disappear.


Original posting 16 Oct 2004
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:09:58
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