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From Trenton, Florida, USA:

My 13 year old son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes four months ago. At onset, he had protein in his urine (approximately 280 when normal would be less than 20). Initially, his A1c was over 14%. Currently his A1c is 5.3%. His protein remains abnormal, but better than 280, is the only information I have been given so far. His blood pressure at the clinic was 127/78. He also is complaining of hair loss. Several laboratory tests have been ordered, but the results are not in yet. I read through several other questions you have answered regarding protein in the urine and kidney disease in newly diagnosed cases. Although I'm sure you are correct, it seems odd that so many of us are writing and researching this topic for young new diabetics. Is it common for children with diabetes to have unrelated kidney disorders?


Kidney problems often show up with protein leakage. The most sensitive of the new kidney tests is called microalbumin or microalbuminuria. This is done on a 24 hour urine collection or an overnight timed urine collection and sometimes also on a spot collection. It often predates more serious kidney problems. It is a nonspecific abnormality and demands that a more specific diagnosis be entertained. Chronic high sugars often can cause such problems as can chronic renal problems of many types. Hypothyroidism sometimes causes such problems. Steroid abuse and drugs, both legal and illegal, also can sometimes cause such problems. It is rare to have significant kidney problems at diagnosis of diabetes, but not impossible. So, you need to go back to your physicians and await their diagnostic test results since this will likely answer such questions -- and hopefully allow you to figure out if this is a really problem or not -- and what might be done to treat this if it persists.


Original posting 16 Nov 2004
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:00
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