Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team

From Canada:

My two year old grandson was diagnosed with type 1 about three months ago. He had a night terror during which his sugar was low and he had to be treated. Is it possible that he has had these lows at night before and just didn't wake up or does this go hand in hand? I guess my concern is that he might slip into a low that we would not be aware of. Does the body just correct itself until he comes out of it? This is all so new to us and I am trying to understand these hypoglycemic reactions. Also, will this be something he will continue to have?


Low blood sugars may happen more likely during nighttime, especially during the first months of the insulin treatment after diagnosis. Generally, people with type 1 diabetes wake up when sugar drops, with symptoms, even in a child. This may be more difficult as children sleep more deeply than adults. When frequent low sugars occur, there is loss of the early warning symptoms of hypoglycemia. This may have happened to your grandson. There is some evidence to suggest that backing away from tight control, avoiding low blood sugars over the daytime, can allow for some of the symptoms of hypoglycemia to return. Anyway, your grandson requires frequent monitoring, including nighttime monitoring, to determine when lows are occurring and how to at prevent them. I do not know what kind of insulin regimen he is on, but he may have to change in order to prevent the lows. However, this process has to be overseen by your grandson's pediatrician.


Original posting 22 Nov 2004
Posted to Hypoglycemia


  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:00
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.