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Question:

From Memphis, Tennessee, USA:

My situation has to be a very unique situation indeed. I'm taking Amaryl as well as Avandamet. I'm 22 years old. Around the age of 18, I began working out and hitting the weights extremely hard. I would even incorporate cardio and pretty decent dietary habits. I will not lie and say they are/were the best. Indeed, in my current life situation, I work out every morning and I eat good quality meals. Balanced meals are what I try to focus on. I may have a burger every now and again but, for the most part, I eat fruits, vegetables, and lean meats.

My problem is that I can't seem to control the diabetes even though I have youth on my side and I'm extremely active. What am I doing wrong? I still often urinate out my nutrients and I do notice my sugar sometime spiking towards 200 mg/dl [11.1 mmol/L] when I eat maybe white breads and such. Will insulin guarantee me a journey towards victory taking in consideration my active lifestyle and good eating habits? Is there possibly something else that I have outside of diabetes?

Answer:

Amaryl and Avandamet are treatments for type 2 diabetes. Do you really have type 1 diabetes? If you take the above medications but really have type 1 diabetes, you will still have elevated blood sugars because the medications above rely on the patient to still make insulin. People with type 1 diabetes have their insulin-producing cells damaged and do not make insulin. This can be checked by measuring C-peptide levels with a glucose or meal challenge. Normally, they would go up but would be depressed if insulin production was down.

JTL

DTQ-20050315160924
Original posting 17 Apr 2005
Posted to Hyperglycemia and DKA and Insulin

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:02
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