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From San Antonio, Texas, USA:

I was just today diagnosed with nesidioblastosis. I was told this condition is related to gastric bypass surgery I had in 2002. For the last two years, I've experienced passing out, sweats, shaking, confusion, etc. The spells would occur about once a week. I was finally diagnosed as being hypoglycemic and was told that this is easily treated with diet, six small meals a day. I have tried this for eight weeks and now I crash at least once a day, sometimes as many as three times a day. I usually feel a crash coming on when my sugar gets to about 38 mg/dl [2.1 mmol/L], but this isn't always the case. I've even had the paramedics called on me twice.

Today, on my own, I saw a digestive specialist thinking this could be related to gastric bypass surgery. He mentioned nesidioblastosis and said it is imperative I see an endocrinologist. Am I on the right track to getting the help I need? My family doctor doesn't know what to do. He just says my symptoms are "odd". I know I can't keep crashing without doing permanent and serious liver, brain and other damage. Please help! There isn't much out there yet about the correlation between gastric bypass and nesidioblastosis.


Yes, this is a relatively new description of a clinical entity that is evident after gastric bypass surgery. I think you are on the right track by seeking consultation with an endocrinologist. I can see how the recurrent lows have been such a blow to your overall wellbeing. The goal of any treatment is directed at preventing the lows. Nesidioblastosis refers to a secondary stimulation of growth in the insulin-producing cells. You will need to discuss this in more depth with your endocrinologist, as well as learning strategies to avoid the lows.


Original posting 13 Oct 2005
Posted to Nesidioblastosis


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:04
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