advertisement
 

  Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team
Question:

From Buffalo, New York, USA:

I just got my results back from my gestational diabetes testing, done at 26 weeks. My nurse said I passed and was within their number range. However, when she said my result was 76 mg/dl [4.2 mmol/L], I thought this was awfully low. However, my test was done early in the morning without much food in my system. I woke up at 7 a.m., ate a small container of yogurt (NOT sugar-free), had a slice of toast with peanut butter, and some water. At 8:15 a.m., I drank Orange Sunkist since my doctor's office said this was an acceptable drink other than the standard orange drink. One hour later, at 9:15, I had the blood drawn. My nurse said not to give it another thought, but I am still concerned the number is too low. Would I have received a higher number, for example, if my test was done later in the day (after a belly full of food, since she did not require me to fast for the one hour test)? What about hypoglycemia? I've never been tested for that, maybe I don't even have it. I was not the least bit lightheaded or dizzy after drinking the pop. Any thoughts or suggestions? I'm tempted to have her re-do the test for me next week, at an afternoon appointment.

Answer:

A blood glucose of 76 mg/dl is not too low. However, I am not sure that you were properly screened for gestational diabetes. The standard is a 50 gram glucose load with a blood sugar measurement one hour after drinking the glucose solution. Hopefully, this is what you received in the Sunkist drink. The test does not have to be done on an empty stomach and can be done at any time of day.

OWJ

DTQ-20060131144704
Original posting 3 Feb 2006
Posted to Gestational Diabetes

  
advertisement


                 
  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:06
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.